What is Clean Diesel?


Share This Page

July 30, 2015   |   Diesel Technology Forum

Policy Insider

While All Eyes are on Phase 2 Let’s Not Forget About Phase 1

While EPA will be hearing about technologies to meet proposed "Phase 2" fuel economy standards, let's not forget we are already one-and-a-half years into the first ever fuel economy rules, the "Phase 1" standards, for heavy-duty vehicles. Engine and vehicle manufacturers have already developed innovative technologies to further enhance diesel's fuel economy credentials while promoting energy security and greenhouse gas reductions. Between 2014 and 2018, these technologies are expected to save 270 million tons of carbon emissions and 530 million barrels of crude.


Beginning next week, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency will hold public hearings about plans to require already efficient trucks to become even more efficient. According to draft rules issued in June 2015 by both EPA and the Department of Transportation, technologies developed to make heavy-duty trucks even more efficient will reduce carbon emissions by one billion tons by 2027 and save 1.8 billion barrels of crude oil. Put in context, one billion tons of carbon emissions is about 75 percent of the carbon emissions the Obama Administration would like to see eliminated from the electricity generating sector by 2030.

That's definitely impressive, but let's not forget about technologies already on the road today that deliver equally impressive benefits. While the EPA will be hearing from a variety of stakeholders about a variety of technologies capable, or maybe capable, of achieving the impressive fuel economy targets for heavy-duty vehicles beginning in 2021, diesel technology on the road today is hard at work reducing emissions, including greenhouse gases, and saving fuel for vehicle owners. We certainly don't need to wait until 2021 to see impressive emission reduction and fuel savings from heavy-duty vehicles.

Already, clean diesel technologies widely available today developed to meet strict emission standards beginning in model year 2010 heavy-duty vehicles, have reduced carbon emissions by nine million tons and saved 21 million barrels of crude oil. Nationwide, about 22 percent of Class 3-8 heavy-duty vehicles come with a clean diesel engine that meets the model year 2010 standard. The owner of a typical Class 8 long-haul tractor deployed with a model year 2010 engine or newer will save roughly $2,400 a year in fuel costs thanks to fuel saving technology. These benefits are significant when compounded over the life of the truck.

While EPA will be hearing about technologies to meet proposed "Phase 2" fuel economy standards, let's not forget we are already one-and-a-half years into the first ever fuel economy rules, the "Phase 1" standards, for heavy-duty vehicles. Engine and vehicle manufacturers have already developed innovative technologies to further enhance diesel's fuel economy credentials while promoting energy security and greenhouse gas reductions. Between 2014 and 2018, these technologies are expected to save 270 million tons of carbon emissions and 530 million barrels of crude.

These are impressive societal benefits that will be generated in just four years and they will accrue thanks to the diesel powertrain. According to the Fuels Institute, a diesel engine is expected to be deployed in 95-97 percent of medium and heavy-duty vehicles through 2023.


More

All News & Resources


Key Contact

Ezra Finkin
Director, Policy
efinkin@dieselforum.org
301-668-7230

More Policy Insider

What is Clean Diesel?

Watch the Video